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Polygraph Testing

Since the beginning of time humans have been endeavouring to find a way to identify truth from falsehood.

The various methods over history include the Bedouin Bisha'a ritual, the Chinese "Rice Ceremony" and the Egyptian "Method of the Thumb".
Since the beginning of time humans have been endeavouring to find a way to identify truth from falsehood.

The various methods over history include the Bedouin Bisha'a ritual, the Chinese "Rice Ceremony" and the Egyptian "Method of the Thumb".
At the beginning of the 1920's, a Polygraph Machine was invented by William Marston and already in 1923 it was used in a murder trial in the United States (Frye Trial). During the proceedings it was argued by the Polygraph examiner that the defendant is speaking the truth and did not commit the murder. The judge revoked the statement of the polygraph examiner, as the machine was still in its early stages of research, and the defendant was sentenced to life imprisonment. Three years later the real murderer was found and it was proven that the polygraph machine was correct and therefore fundamental in telling truth from falsehood, even better than a certified judge.

Since then almost a century has passed, the polygraph machine has been developed and has become the most effective method for telling truth from lies. Many theories have been built by leading world specialists regarding these tests, which has executed many global studies proving by research and statistics that the machine has a rate of success of between 87-98%, this statistic has been acknowledged by organizations and legal courts around the world. The variations of precision vary according to the level of the polygraph examiners, the subject, type of questions asked as well as final analysis of the test results.
Most of the certified polygraph examiners represent an average success rate of 95-98%, where the remaining small percentage is not due to error, but to the inability to reach unambiguous results.
The polygraph machine works by defining unsolicited and autonomous nerve reactions of the human body which are translated by the machine onto a graph called a chart (today it is computerized) and by other methods. An experienced tester can recognize whether the person opposite him is telling the truth or not.

The testing procedure includes a wide range of psychological exercises which the person undergoes while re-enacting the event, mental preparation, a comprehensive set of questions and bringing the person to trust the machine.
Albeit the belief that the Polygraph is not acceptable in a court of law, in a civil court it is accepted and in many cases where it is difficult to reach a decision regarding a specific issue or conflicting statements between the parties, the judge will suggest, and sometimes insist, on a polygraph test in order to decide the case.

In Criminal cases, the polygraph is used as for investigative purposes, but is however not acceptable as evidence in court. Test results could prove to benefit or be damaging to the accused, but only in addition to actual proof of guilt or innocence.
It should be mentioned that in some countries the polygraph test results are acceptable as evidence in court and can influence judgment, however only on condition they have been done by professionals.
In the United States the polygraph is being implemented in order to test and supervise sexual offenders before releasing them back into society, the project is called PSCOT.

Top scientists in universities around the world are looking to invent other machines and systems for identifying truth from falsehoods, however, till now, all are in agreement that there is no better method which comes close to the success of the polygraph and it is the best available method.